Heritage

Heritage

Off Nonsuch, 1934

It wasn't an expedition for the claustrophobic. Two and a quarter tons of steel dangled from a cable less than an inch thick. The four-foot-wide interior had to accommodate not only the two men, but bulky technical equipment, oxygen tanks, photographic apparatus, and lights and trays of chemicals to soak up carbon dioxide. At 3,000 feet below the surface, the water pressure exerted per square inch exceeds 1,000 pounds. It was an enormous undertaking, not just dangerous but a truly…


Heritage

A Gentleman's Sport

The Preakness it isn’t. In fact, Bermuda lobster racing may rate somewhere on the excitement scale just below waiting for the sheriff’s department to close down the Sunday afternoon pony cart races in Eureka, Kansas. But whatever the racing of…


Heritage

The Significance of Shipwrecks

A version of this article first appeared in Quest: The Journal of Global Underwater Explorers   This is a question I've been asked on several occasions and honestly, it is a fair question. When I first started working for the…


Heritage

Digging Up the Past

Archaeology is a uniquely important part of the historic preservation process. The Archaeological Research Committee at the Bermuda National Trust is a very active volunteer group undertaking archaeological excavations of historic houses and properties throughout the island, more often than…


Heritage

Shark Oil Barometer

Published in the October 1973 issue of The Bermudian. Written by Eric Johnson. Gilbert Lamb doesn’t play the ponies or the English football pools, but he has been known to wager on the weather and wins. His winnings are never…

Heritage

Hurricane Easy

Published in Crow’s Nest, November 1975   One of the strangest phenomena in the recorded history of hurricanes occurred off Bermuda in September 1951. That was before the weather people began naming hurricanes after girls. Chief forecaster Grady Norton of…