• In the Bermuda Gazette of July 18, 1818, sailmaker David Davis, advertised that he had “respectfully” informed the public he had “taken Mr. Astwood’s ferry, by his kind approbation, with a commodious Boat for ferrying passengers across, being the first started in this employment, and would be thankful for encouragement.” Thus started the Lower Ferry service taking passengers across the harbour from Hamilton to Crow Lane.
  • In July 1825, Miss Pallais, possibly the daughter of Peter Pallais, a famous silversmith in Bermuda, opened a school on Crow Lane for young ladies who required “the usual branches of an English education.” She charged 4 pounds for teaching spelling, reading, writing and arithmetic, and 2 pounds extra for teaching English grammar, geography, and “fine needlework.”
  • July 3, 1832 the Bermuda Gazette published the Governor’s proclamation pertaining to quarantine regulations compulsory for ships arriving from the river Saint Lawrence in Canada because of an outbreak of cholera in North America. It also published a recipe for cholera which “taken at a draft, seldom, it is said, fails of affording instant relief, viz. 1 oz of cinnamon water, 35 drops tincture of opium, one drachm of lavender, and a drachm tincture of rhubarb.” (A drachm equals an eighth of an ounce.) The Governor also ordered that Wednesday, 25 July be set apart as a day of fasting and prayer throughout Bermuda in order “to keep us from that grievous disease with which several places on the Continent of America are visited.” In addition, he recommended as a precaution against cholera that “Heads of all Families” should immediately have their “Houses and Servant’s Rooms well whitewashed inside and out, and to have all kinds of dirt and filth removed from the Kitchens, Cellars and Outhouses of every sort….”
  • July 3, 1942 the chairman of the Board of Works and Board of Agriculture announced that “due to the shortage of oats, horse- drawn vehicles had to be taken off the road and the horses put out to pasture to keep them alive. Owners would have to obtain permits to work the horses.” One week later, the Royal Gazette announced local merchants had no more beer in stock.
  • On July 2, 1964, the new swing bridge in St. George’s was officially opened.
  • On July 20, 1969, American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin became the first humans ever to land on the moon. Taking his first step onto the moon, Armstrong famously said, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”
  • On July 31, 1972, Bermuda’s currency switched from British pound sterling (GBP) to the Bermudian dollar (BMD). From that date, the Bermuda dollar has been pegged to the US dollar.

  • A devastating electrical fire at Belco caused an island-wide power outage in July 2005. The company said at the time that a failure on one of the plant’s five switchboards caused the fire. Fire fighters took about 11 hours to put out the flames, which at times reached a height of 60ft.