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Bermuda Beasts: Burrowing Mussel

The black date mussel (Lithophaga nigra) might not look like much more than a dark, inert splodge, easily passed over by divers. However, quietly and discreetly, aggregations of these little bivalves alter the marine landscape in enormous ways, as evidenced by their scientific name, which literally means ‘rock eater’. The species is seldom seen. When diving, individuals must search below rocky overhangs to see the tip of the black mussel in its oval shaped burrow.   1. Only 4cm long,…


Nature

Bermuda Beasts: Chicken Liver Sponge

Is it a plant? Is it an animal? Scientists believe that sponges are a very primitive animal, one of the first groups to branch off the evolutionary tree after the common ancestor of all animals. They are multi-cellular organisms that…


Nature

Morgan’s Island Hosts Rediscovered Endemic Snail

Morgan’s Island is a sentinel to Ely’s Harbour, an idyllic calm cove used for mooring pleasure boats. This picturesque little island is owned by the Bermuda National Trust, and has come in to the limelight recently as one of two…


Nature

Bermuda Beasts: The Hurricane Spider

The Hurricane Spider, or Golden Orb-Weaver as it's officially known is a master at web construction. It builds conspicuous webs in trees, sometimes spanning narrow roads and although hurricane spiders feed on a variety of insects, their webs have been…


Nature

8 Smells Every Bermudian Knows

Hold ya nose! This one's a doozy!   1. Road Toad Unfortunately, toads have become frequent casualties on Bermuda’s roads, much like land crabs used to be in their huge numbers. And when they get squashed and bake on the…

Nature

Bermuda Beasts: Mosquito

It's summer, and that means mosquitoes are out in droves. There are over 3,500 different species of mosquito, six of which have been recorded in Bermuda. The Asian tiger mosquito is a known carrier of chikungunya disease, while the yellow…