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Field Notes: The Calla Lily

The Calla Lily of horticulturalists and the so-called Calla Lily of gardens is known botanically as Zantedeschia aethiopica. Originally this plant was named Calla aethiopica, later on its name was changed to Richardia Africana, but it was discovered by further research that Richardia of Kunth was antedated by another Richardia so a new genus was created. Zantedeschia is therefore considered by the latest  authorities to be the tenable name and is retained in the “Nomina conservanda” of the International Rules…


Nature

A Resilient Force: The Bermuda Cedar

Bermudians are very familiar with the Bermuda Cedar, Juniperus bermudiana, our remarkable endemic tree. The history of the Bermuda cedar is both tragic and beautiful: it has overcome unfathomable devastation, and has proven repeatedly that it’s an absolutely resilient force…


Nature

Bermuda Beasts: Spiny Lobster

The first of September marks the start of lobster season in Bermuda, when it is legal to possess, hunt (so long as one has a permit) and consume the sweet meat of the spiny lobster. Between September 1st and March…


Nature

A Walk at Blue Hole Park

One of Bermuda’s most magical walks links the prosaically named Blue Hole Park with the Walsingham Nature Reserve in Hamilton Parish. It’s magical because its various pathways lead to hidden attractions and because while some of its trees (the poincianas,…


Nature

Field Notes: Tamarisk

Bermuda is by no means devoid of green foliage, despite the loss of probably seventy per cent of the native Juniper. The subject of these notes, the Tamarisk (Tamarix Gallica), or as many people prefer to call it, the Spruce,…

Nature

Spring in the Garden

In other countries spring denotes the end of snow and cold and the beginning of the growing season. But what about Bermuda? We never have snow and, as noted in earlier articles, our planting season starts during the fall and…