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Field Notes: Whistling Pine

This article was taken from our archives. It first appeared in the January 1953 issue of The Bermudian. It appears here exactly as it did originally.  During the last five years Bermudians have become almost as interested in the tree known, popularly, as the Whistling or Australian Pine, as they are in the native cedar tree. The reason for this is, that the Whistling Pine finds Bermuda a very desirable place to abide and grows with extreme rapidity. It is,…


Nature

Bermuda Beasts: Sea Hare

These marine gastropods are some of the largest sea slugs in the ocean. They look like hardly more than a clump of fabric underwater, but upon closer inspection, divers will find the billowing body of the sea hare, which appears…


Garden

Fall in the Garden

Yet another year has gone by and after a year of COVID ups and downs, we are once again at the start of our growing season. As usual, this is the season for weeding, sifting and fertilising our garden soil,…


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Bermuda’s Favourite Haunts: Westward Ho!

When you hear at Billy's back, your first question would be Billy who? In this case it's the least likely man in this part of an unlikely era for bona-fide ghosts. When we say that West Point is humming with…


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Bermuda’s Favourite Haunts: The Ghost of Jubilee Road

The night of July 14, 1979 hangs on my memory like a pall. The journey home to Orange Valley from Smith’s Parish would haunt me for a long time to come. It was nearly midnight when I headed home on…

Garden

Field Notes: Garden Hibiscus

This article was taken from our archives. It first appeared in The Bermudian in May 1952. It appears here exactly as it did originally. The Garden Hibiscus needs little introduction for it is found in practically every garden and is…