Aderonke Bademosi Wilson’s advice to anyone caught between careers: give yourself time. Doing so helped her identify her interests and skills and  how she could put them to work.  The former director of the government’s communications team launched ABWilson Consulting in 2023.  “In making decisions about what I wanted to be able to do during this time in my consulting career, I looked at what I have accomplished in the past,” she said “I’m a seasoned communications professional and a facilitator and so I made the decision to combine both, focusing specifically on internal communications, helping organisations to change.”

Her business helps companies and organisations identify and implement sustainable change practices using a process called Appreciative Inquiry. The change needn’t be massive. Appreciative Inquiry can assist where there is a new process being put in place or a new team member, where there’s a need for team enhancement, team building or a new way of conducting meetings – any new systems or changes that an organisation is going through.

Appreciative Inquiry involves collaborative inquiry, constructive dialogue and the co-creation of solutions, developing within any organisation or human system a culture of positivity and continuous improvement.

Bademosi Wilson

The reason it works, Bademosi Wilson said, is because it focuses on an organisation’s assets, “emphasising what is working well and leveraging strengths to drive innovation, productivity and transformation”. “Appreciative Inquiry involves collaborative inquiry, constructive dialogue and the co-creation of solutions, developing within any organisation or human system a culture of positivity and continuous improvement,” she said. “Appreciative Inquiry amplifies positive aspects of an organisation. Change begins with asking the first question and research has shown, the more positive the question, the more positive and long-lasting the change.”

Starting Friday March 22, is a podcast,, Heart of the Matter, that will continue the theme. Acquaintances, friends and colleagues from around the world have weighed in with answers to the same ten questions. Bademosi Wilson believes it will be an interesting listen.

But it was the joy of helping companies achieve their goals that drew her back to consulting after a long hiatus. From 2006 to 2015 Bademosi Wilson and her brother Oluremi Bademosi ran The Stratford Group. “I’ve had some great jobs in my career; I’ve worked with some amazing people. And what I discovered was when I was consulting previously, it provided me with great flexibility, I met amazing people, worked on incredible projects. And the diversity of those projects and the people that I worked with is what lured me back into consulting,” she said.

The real work begins once clients let her know their goals and how they define success. “From that I create the group experience, usually through a workshop or facilitated meeting. And then we put a plan together on how to implement that change.” Feedback has been remarkable. “People that have used it have really, really welcomed the process because it leaves everybody feeling optimistic, enthusiastic and ready to begin the process.

The work can be ongoing or limited to a series of workshops. It all depends on the organisation’s needs. If they want to hire me to help with the internal communications process, then I will provide that support, working with managers [and] supervisors to ensure that they have the tools that they need to support the change for them and their team members.

Bademosi Wilson

“I definitely help organisations to evolve and move forward in a collaborative way. If you want to make change, you have to make sure that everybody’s voice is heard and they have a role in the process in addition to understanding why the change is taking place, what their role is in the change and how they can help to implement that change.” The work can be ongoing or limited to a series of workshops. It all depends on the organisation’s needs, Bademosi Wilson said. “After I’ve conducted the workshop, if they want to hire me to help with the internal communications process, then I will provide that support, working with managers [and] supervisors to ensure that they have the tools that they need to support the change for them and their team members.”

She discovered the Appreciative Inquiry approach sometime around 2008. A client of The Stratford Group invited her to do some work with him and the sponsor of a project. “The project sponsor interviewed me in a way I had never been interviewed before, and he used the Appreciative Inquiry approach. I was excited by that interview, first of all, and then enthusiastic about the project.”

In the autumn of 2009 Bademosi Wilson “was fortunate” to attend the World Appreciative Inquiry Conference in Kathmandu, Nepal. 
“We had 400 people from 40 countries around the world in this conference and it was thrilling to be in that space. Going to the various workshops, listening in on various speeches, and just being a part of that space, I knew that this was work I wanted to continue. This was work that I wanted to incorporate into my practice.” She made “lots and lots of notes” and at the end, felt she needed to share them. With Gordon Johnson and Dr. Duranda Greene, who was then president of the Bermuda College, she held a number of public workshops between 2010 and 2012.

Bademosi Wilson also decided to pair Appreciation Inquiry with some of the practical aspects of her communications degree and create a radio programme and podcast, Heart of the Matter, interviewing different people in Bermuda as well as acquaintances, friends and colleagues from around the world.

Bademosi Wilson also decided to pair Appreciation Inquiry with some of the practical aspects of her communications degree and create a radio programme, Heart of the Matter. The late Ron Lightbourne was the host; Bademosi Wilson’s brother, Bim Bademosi, was the audio engineer. “Ron and I would find different people in Bermuda and we just set about and interviewed them. What made the radio programme unique is that we asked the same questions of all of our guests. And the stories that they told were just incredible.”

More than a decade later, a new version of Heart of the Matter will do the same. “I thought, technology has caught up with us…how can I recreate the radio programme?  And so I sat down and created a podcast. The podcast is in the same theme as the radio programme in that I have created questions that I ask of all of the guests. The only difference is, I’m the host this time.“It’s definitely a nod to Ron and the work that he and I did together and the fact that he was an amazing host. I wanted to continue the brand because it is the same concept – asking the same questions of my guests.”

Also known for the photography she has exhibited over the years, Bademosi Wilson decided to use it to illustrate a 2024 calendar she created. Each month has a different theme; a QR code ties to a blog on her website, abwilsonphotography.com.

“In addition to that I’ve created what I call the 3C Gatherings. The 3Cs are conversation, connection and community. I hold these meetings on the first Thursday of every month and I have experts in that month’s theme join us and we have a great experience interacting and learning about that month’s theme and what it means to the participants,” she said.

Heart of the Matter can be heard on abwilsonconsulting.com as well as Spotify, and other platforms.